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Jeff Mize Jeff Mize, RRT, CHT, UHMSADS | Updated on Apr 8, 2019

This is a recommended read for all hyperbaric clinicians picked by our editorial team.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Oxygen Compatibility of Skin and Wound Care Products.

Bernatchez SF, Tucker J, Chiffoleau G.

Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle). 2017 Nov 1;6(11):371-381. doi: 10.1089/wound.2017.0742.

PMID: 29098113 Free PMC Article


Objective: Use test methods to assess the oxygen compatibility of various wound care products.

Approach: There are currently no standard test methods specifically for evaluating the oxygen compatibility and safety of materials under hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) conditions. However, tests such as the oxygen index (OI), oxygen exposure (OE), and autogenous ignition temperature (AIT) can provide useful information.

Results: The OI test measures the minimum oxygen concentration that will support candle-like burning, and it was used to test 44 materials. All but two exhibited an OI equal to or greater (safer) than a control material commonly used in HBO. The OE test exposes each material to an oxygen-enriched atmosphere (>99.5% oxygen) to monitor temperature and pressure for an extended duration. The results of the OE testing indicated that none of the 44 articles tested with this method self-ignited within the 60C, 3 atm pressurized oxygen atmosphere. The AIT test exposes materials to a rapid ramp up in temperature in HBO conditions at 3 atm until ignition occurs. Ten wound care materials and seven materials usually avoided in HBO chambers were tested. The AIT ranged from 138C to 384C for wound care products and from 146C to 420C for the other materials.

Innovation: This work provides useful data and recommendations to help develop a new standard approach for evaluating the HBO compatibility of wound care products to ensure safety for patients and clinicians.

Conclusion: The development of an additional test to measure the risk of electrostatic discharge of materials in HBO conditions is needed.

About the Authors

Jeff Mize, RRT, CHT, UHMSADS
Jeff is a Principal Partner with Midwest Hyperbaric LLC and is the Co-founder and Chief Clinical Officer for Wound Reference. Jeff is a Registered Respiratory Therapist, a Certified Hyperbaric Technologist (CHT) by the National Board of Diving and Hyperbaric Medical Technology, a Certified Wound Care Associate (CWCA) by the American Academy of Wound Management. After receiving primary hyperbaric training from National Baromedical Services he trained as a UHMS Safety Director and is a UHMS Facility Accreditation Surveyor. He is the 2010 recipient of the Gurnee Award and the 2013 recipient of the Paul C. Baker Award for Hyperbaric Oxygen Safety Excellence. He has also served on the UHMS Board of Directors (2010-2015) In 2020, Jeff received "The Associates Distinguished Service award (UHMSADS). "This award is presented to individual Associate member of the Society whose professional activities and standing are deemed to be exceptional and deserving of the highest recognition we can bestow upon them . . . who have demonstrated devotion and significant time and effort to the administrative, clinical, mechanical, physiological, safety, technical practice, and/or advancement of the hyperbaric community while achieving the highest level of expertise in their respective field. . . demonstrating the professionalism and ethical standards embodied in this recognition and in the UHMS mission.”
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