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Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 3: Shop smartly

Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 3: Shop smartly

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Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 3: Shop smartly

Label reading - one of the keys to smart grocery shopping

Grocery shopping can be overwhelming; with the abundance of options, how do you choose what is right for you? Luckily all foods have nutritional labels. They are called the ‘Nutrition Facts’ label. Learning how to read them correctly is incredibly important! Figure 1 and Table 1 below show some simple steps to assist in your label reading. 


Figure 1. Sample Nutrition Facts Label

Table 1. How to read the Nutrition Facts label on food products. Adapted from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics [1]
StepsDetails
1. Start with the Serving Size


  • Search for both the serving size—the amount people typically eat at one time—and the number of servings in the package.
  • Compare your portion size—the amount you actually eat—to the serving size listed on the panel. For example, if the serving size is one cup and you eat two cups, you are getting twice the calories, fat and other nutrients as what is listed on the label.
  • 2. Check Out the Total Calories
    • Find out how many calories there are in a single serving.
    3. Let the Percent Daily Values Be a Guide
  • Use percent Daily Values (DV) to help evaluate how a particular food fits into your daily meal plan. Percent DV are for the entire day, not just one meal or snack. DV are average levels of nutrients for a person eating 2,000 calories a day. A food item with a 5 percent DV of fat provides 5 percent of the total fat that a person consuming 2,000 calories a day should eat. 
  • You may need more or less than 2,000 calories per day. For some nutrients, you may need more or less than 100 percent DV. To find out how many calories you need, see the topic " Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 1: Map out your meals“.
  • Low is 5 percent or less. Aim low in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sodium.
  • High is 20 percent or more. Aim high in vitamins, minerals and fiber.
  • 4. Check Out the Nutrition Terms on the Box
  • Low calorie: 40 calories or less per serving.
  • Low cholesterol: 20 milligrams or less and 2 grams or less of saturated fat per serving.
  • Reduced: At least 25 percent less of the specified nutrient or calories than the usual product.
  • Good source of: Provides at least 10 to 19 percent of the DV of a particular vitamin or nutrient per serving.
  • Excellent source of: Provides at least 20 percent or more of the DV of a particular vitamin or nutrient per serving.
  • Calorie free: Less than five calories per serving.
  • Fat free/sugar free: Less than ½ gram of fat or sugar per serving.
  • Low sodium: 140 milligrams or less of sodium per serving.
  • High in: Provides 20 percent or more of the DV of a specified nutrient per serving.
  • Try some of these tips when you next go shopping and soon you will be a master at reading nutrition labels! 

    How do I put what I have learned into action? 

    Glad you asked! Click on the topics below to jump-start good eating habits that will help you heal your wounds faster 

    • Patient Education - Nutrition for Wound Healing : Understanding the Basics
    • Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing : What if I have other health conditions?
    • Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 1: Map out your meals
    • Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 1: Map out your meals
    • Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 3: Shop smartly (this topic)
    • Patient Education - Nutrition for wound healing in action - Step 4: What if I don’t cook

    When to contact your healthcare provider

    In general, if there is little to no improvement in the condition of your wound/pressure ulcer, it is a good time to reach out to your healthcare provider. Proper nutrition can pave the way to a clean and healthy wound, as well as improve your overall health and well-being. 


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    NOTE: This is a controlled document. This document is not a substitute for proper training, experience, and exercising of professional judgment. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the contents, neither the authors nor the Wound Reference, Inc. give any guarantee as to the accuracy of the information contained in them nor accept any liability, with respect to loss, damage, injury or expense arising from any such errors or omissions in the contents of the work.

    REFERENCES

    1. Eat Right. The Basics of the Nutrition Facts Label .;.
    Topic 1470 Version 1.0