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Weng T, Wu P, Zhang W, Zheng Y, Li Q, Jin R, Chen H, You C, Guo S, Han C, Wang X, et al.
Journal of translational medicine. Date of publication 2020 Feb 3;volume 18(1):53.
1. J Transl Med. 2020 Feb 3;18(1):53. doi: 10.1186/s12967-020-02248-5. Regeneration of skin appendages and nerves: current status and further challenges. Weng T(1), Wu P(1), Zhang W(1), Zheng Y(2), Li Q(1), Jin R(1), Chen H(1), You C(1), Guo S(3), Han C(1), Wang X(4). Author information: (1)Department of Burns & Wound Care Center, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, Hangzhou, 310009, China. (2)Department of Breast Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, 310022, China. (3)Department of Plastic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310009, China. (4)Department of Burns & Wound Care Center, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, College of Medicine, Hangzhou, 310009, China. wangxingang8157@zju.edu.cn. Tissue-engineered skin (TES), as an analogue of native skin, is promising for wound repair and regeneration. However, a major drawback of TES products is a lack of skin appendages and nerves to enhance skin healing, structural integrity and skin vitality. Skin appendages and nerves are important constituents for fully functional skin. To date, many studies have yielded remarkable results in the field of skin appendages reconstruction and nerve regeneration. However, patients often complain about a loss of skin sensation and even cutaneous chronic pain. Restoration of pain, temperature, and touch perceptions should now be a major challenge to solve in order to improve patients' quality of life. Current strategies to create skin appendages and sensory nerve regeneration are mainly based on different types of seeding cells, scaffold materials, bioactive factors and involved signaling pathways. This article provides a comprehensive overview of different strategies for, and advances in, skin appendages and sensory nerve regeneration, which is an important issue in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. DOI: 10.1186/s12967-020-02248-5 PMCID: PMC6996190 PMID: 32014004
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