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Levin SR, Arinze N, Siracuse JJ, et al.
Trends in cardiovascular medicine. Date of publication 2020 Apr 1;volume 30(3):125-130.
1. Trends Cardiovasc Med. 2020 Apr;30(3):125-130. doi: 10.1016/j.tcm.2019.04.002. Epub 2019 Apr 15. Lower extremity critical limb ischemia: A review of clinical features and management. Levin SR(1), Arinze N(1), Siracuse JJ(2). Author information: (1)Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, 88 E. Newton Street C520, Boston, MA 02118, United States. (2)Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, 88 E. Newton Street C520, Boston, MA 02118, United States. Electronic address: jeffrey.siracuse@bmc.org. Lower extremity critical limb ischemia (CLI) represents symptoms related to end-stage atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease manifested by rest pain and tissue loss. It is associated with increased risk of limb amputation and cardiovascular-related mortality. The prevalence and cost of CLI are expected to increase with both the aging of the U.S. population and continued influence of smoking and diabetes. Treatments encompass measures to reduce cardiovascular risk and preserve limb viability. Despite increasing popularity of endovascular modalities, revascularization with either surgical bypass or endovascular intervention is the cornerstone of therapy. Adequate Level I data to guide decisions regarding optimal strategies to treat CLI, particularly in patients who are candidates for both open and percutaneous approaches, are currently lacking. Ongoing randomized controlled trials aim to resolve the clinical equipoise. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. DOI: 10.1016/j.tcm.2019.04.002 PMID: 31005554
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Arterial Ulcer - Introduction and Assessment
How to Assess a Patient with Chronic Wounds
Arterial Ulcer - Surgical Treatment