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Honaker JS, Forston MR, Davis EA, Weisner MM, Morgan JA, Sacca E, et al.
Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the Eur.... Date of publication 2016 Nov 1;volume 24(6):1081-1088.
1. Wound Repair Regen. 2016 Nov;24(6):1081-1088. doi: 10.1111/wrr.12479. Epub 2016 Nov 21. The effect of adjunctive noncontact low frequency ultrasound on deep tissue pressure injury. Honaker JS(1), Forston MR(2), Davis EA(3), Weisner MM(2), Morgan JA(2), Sacca E(2). Author information: (1)Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. (2)Department of Rehabilitative Services, Baptist Health Lexington, Lexington, Kentucky. (3)Department of Nursing Education, Baptist Health Lexington, Lexington, Kentucky. The optimal treatment for deep tissue pressure injuries has not been determined. Deep tissue pressure injuries represent a more ominous early stage pressure injury that may evolve into full thickness ulceration despite implementing the standard of care for pressure injury. A longitudinal prospective historical case control study design was used to determine the effectiveness of noncontact low frequency ultrasound plus standard of care (treatment group) in comparison to standard of care (control group) in reducing deep tissue pressure injury severity, total surface area, and final pressure injury stage. The Honaker Suspected Deep Tissue Injury Severity Scale (range 3-18[more severe]) was used to determine deep tissue pressure injury severity at enrollment (Time 1) and discharge (Time 2). A total of 60 subjects (Treatment = 30; Control= 30) were enrolled in the study. In comparison to the control group mean deep tissue pressure injury total surface area change at Time 2 (0.3 cm2 ), the treatment group had a greater decrease (8.8 cm2 ) that was significant (t = 2.41, p = 0.014, r2  = 0.10). In regards to the Honaker Suspected Deep Tissue Injury Severity Scale scores, the treatment group had a significantly lower score (7.6) in comparison to the control group (11.9) at time 2, with a mean difference of 4.6 (t = 6.146, p = 0.0001, r2  = 0.39). When considering the final pressure ulcer stage at Time 2, the control group were mostly composed of unstageable pressure ulcer (57%) and deep tissue pressure injury severity (27%). In contrast, the treatment group final pressure ulcer stages were less severe and were mostly composed of stage 2 pressure injury (50%) and deep tissue pressure injury severity (23%) were the most common at time 2. The results of this study have shown that deep tissue pressure injury severity treated with noncontact low frequency ultrasound within 5 days of onset and in conjunction with standard of care may improve outcomes as compared to standard of care only. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society. DOI: 10.1111/wrr.12479 PMID: 27672011 [Indexed for MEDLINE]
Appears in following Topics:
Cellular and/or Tissue Based Products
Pressure Ulcers/Injuries - Treatment