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Humphrey JD, Dufresne ER, Schwartz MA, et al.
Nature reviews. Molecular cell biology. Date of publication 2014 Dec 1;volume 15(12):802-12.
1. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2014 Dec;15(12):802-12. doi: 10.1038/nrm3896. Epub 2014 Oct 22. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis. Humphrey JD(1), Dufresne ER(2), Schwartz MA(3). Author information: (1)Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University. (2)1] Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University. [2] Department of Cell Biology, Yale University. (3)1] Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University. [2] Department of Cell Biology, Yale University. [3] Department of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 06520 USA. Soft connective tissues at steady state are dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to them to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the ECM by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechanoregulation process, which includes the deposition, rearrangement or removal of the ECM to maintain overall form and function. Progress towards understanding the molecular, cellular and tissue-level effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped to identify key questions for future research. DOI: 10.1038/nrm3896 PMCID: PMC4513363 PMID: 25355505 [Indexed for MEDLINE]
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