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Haddad AG, Giatsidis G, Orgill DP, Halvorson EG, et al.
Clinics in plastic surgery. Date of publication 2017 Jul 1;volume 44(3):627-634.
1. Clin Plast Surg. 2017 Jul;44(3):627-634. doi: 10.1016/j.cps.2017.02.019. Epub 2017 Apr 1. Skin Substitutes and Bioscaffolds: Temporary and Permanent Coverage. Haddad AG(1), Giatsidis G(2), Orgill DP(2), Halvorson EG(3). Author information: (1)Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. (2)Division of Plastic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. (3)Plastic Surgery Center of Asheville, 5 Livingston Street, Asheville, NC 28801, USA. Electronic address: eric.halvorson@gmail.com. Advancements in surgical wound treatment have led to skin substitutes and bioscaffolds as temporary and permanent coverage for burn wounds. Skin substitutes are used to improve wound coverage and restore the functional and aesthetic qualities of skin, and help to prevent wound infection and maintain a moist wound healing environment. Although allografts are preferred when autografts are not possible, high costs and limited availability have led to the use of xenografts and the development of skin substitutes and bioscaffolds. Despite constant evolution in the development of these skin substitutes and bioscaffolds, no single product stands out as the gold standard. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. DOI: 10.1016/j.cps.2017.02.019 PMID: 28576252 [Indexed for MEDLINE]
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Cellular and/or Tissue Based Products